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Madingley Hall

Cambridge

We are delighted to offer the garden being open for Gardens and Health Week including the medicinal garden between Monday 20th and Thursday 23rd August during daylight hours.. Please note we are unable to open at the weekend. The hall is not open except for the terrace bar for the purchase of refreshments. A guide is available in the front porch. Members of the Garden Team will be here during the week to answer questions. C16 Hall (not open) set in 8 acres of attractive grounds landscaped by Capability Brown. Features incl landscaped walled garden with hazel walk, alpine bed, medicinal border and rose pergola. Historic meadow, topiary, mature trees and wide variety of hardy plants.
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    Madingley is a garden which has both unusual and familiar plants, predominately trees, shrubs, herbaceous and some alpines. The 60 metre hazel arched walk dates to 1849 and is a special feature in the garden. The medicinal border is divided into areas according to their use, aromatherapy/perfumery, dye plants, medicinal herbs both traditional and modern and culinary plants. Open the garden gate to wellbeing: medicinal plants
    Herbalism is the study of botany and use of plants intended for medicinal purposes. Plants have been the basis for medical treatments through much of human history, and such traditional medicine is still widely practiced today.
    Many of our gardens grow plants which can be used for medicinal purposes and to aid mental wellbeing. We spoke to Richard, Head Gardener at the National Garden Scheme garden, Madingley Hall in Cambridgeshire, to find out more about the medicinal plants in his garden, their fascinating histories and how to grow them at home.
    Which medicinal plants do you grow at Madingley Hall?
    I started working at Madingley Hall in the mid-1980s and I inherited a small, medicinal border. Just over ten years ago, I decided to regenerate the border completely, mixing traditional, Tudor style planting with modern - introducing a range of plants, from culinary to medicinal, dye and aromatherapy. The plants I grow in this space all have their own unique qualities, but there are a few that particularly stand out. They are:
    Lemon verbena
    Before its medicinal qualities were discovered, lemon verbena was commonly used in perfume. Now it is more often found in your tea; as a mater of fact my neighbours actually go to bed with a cup of it most nights. There are many benefits to this plant - as well as being calming, it can help to aid digestion and reduce cramps. As a luscious green plant, it also adds plenty of character to the garden.
    Foxglove
    Also known as drop-seed, foxglove holds the digitoxin that is used in modern medicine for heart regulatory tablets. Discovered by a doctor in the 18th century who was desperate to help his wife with an illness, foxglove has since been used to aid heart weakness, irregular heartbeats and improve the bloodstream to vital organs.
    Meadow sweet
    You can quite commonly find this one at the side of the road. Meadow sweet is a tall plant which grows clusters of white flowers and it has a long history as a medicinal plant and was a favourite among Tudor royalty for its sweet scent. As well as adding some beauty to our border here at Madingley Hall, it is also important to modern medicine, being one of the key ingredients for aspirin tablets!
    What is your favourite medicinal plant?
    It's difficult to chose just one, but I think it would have to be Americana, also known as ‘Virginia poke weed’.
    This is a beautiful, maroon coloured plant, which in the garden has grown over six-feet in height.
    Most commonly used as a dye plant, in the past people also chewed on the berries that Americana produce, in the belief that they would ease arthritic pain, and the symptoms of glandular fever.
    The berries on this plant are highly toxic, so this is definitely a practice that's best left to the experts!
    Which plants are associated with mental wellbeing?
    The two that stand out to me are rosemary and camomile.
    Rosemary has been used for its medicinal qualities since the 14th century, and traditionally is believed to aid memory and promote calmness.
    Camomile lawn is much the same and is often found in herbal teas in the supermarket. This plant helps to aid sleep, relieve stress and help you relax, so similar to lemon verbena, this is a great tea to try before bed.
    What advice would you share for people thinking about growing their own medicinal plant patch?
    Growing your own patch of these plants can be really easy and quite simple.
    I would recommend planting a small tub of mixed plants and herbs and placing it outside your backdoor. Each evening, as part of your routine, maybe after doing the washing-up for example, step outside and run your hands through their leaves to enjoy the scents and essences they provide.
    To start, try planting a selection of pineapple sage, lemon verbena, some lavender, rosemary and a few English Marigolds to add a pop of colour to your tub. For some additional scents, why not pop a curry plant in or add some mint leaves too.

Press and Media Coverage

Featured in BBC Look East

Madingley Hall- Canceled

Refreshments:

On this day, this garden is open by arrangement, which means that you will have to contact the owner to arrange visits for groups.

Pre-booking essential, please go to our events page to book your tickets.

Admission by donation

Admission:
  • Adult:
  • Concessions:
  • Child:

On this day, this garden opens as part of .

Admission also gets you entry to this garden in the area:

Click the dropdown arrow next to the opening date above to find details of entry costs and to add the opening to your online calendar.

Click on any opening date on the calendar above to find details of entry times, entry price and to add the opening to your online calendar.

  • Regular opening
  • Open by arrangement only
  • Cancelled opening
Owner Information

University of Cambridge
01223 746222
reservations@madingleyhall.co.uk
http://www.madingleyhall.co.uk

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How to find us

Madingley Hall
Cambridge
Cambridgeshire
CB23 8AQ

4m W of Cambridge.

More about Madingley Hall

Madingley is a garden which has both unusual and familiar plants, predominately trees, shrubs, herbaceous and some alpines. The 60 metre hazel arched walk dates to 1849 and is a special feature in the garden. The medicinal border is divided into areas according to their use, aromatherapy/perfumery, dye plants, medicinal herbs both traditional and modern and culinary plants. Open the garden gate to wellbeing: medicinal plants
Herbalism is the study of botany and use of plants intended for medicinal purposes. Plants have been the basis for medical treatments through much of human history, and such traditional medicine is still widely practiced today.
Many of our gardens grow plants which can be used for medicinal purposes and to aid mental wellbeing. We spoke to Richard, Head Gardener at the National Garden Scheme garden, Madingley Hall in Cambridgeshire, to find out more about the medicinal plants in his garden, their fascinating histories and how to grow them at home.
Which medicinal plants do you grow at Madingley Hall?
I started working at Madingley Hall in the mid-1980s and I inherited a small, medicinal border. Just over ten years ago, I decided to regenerate the border completely, mixing traditional, Tudor style planting with modern - introducing a range of plants, from culinary to medicinal, dye and aromatherapy. The plants I grow in this space all have their own unique qualities, but there are a few that particularly stand out. They are:
Lemon verbena
Before its medicinal qualities were discovered, lemon verbena was commonly used in perfume. Now it is more often found in your tea; as a mater of fact my neighbours actually go to bed with a cup of it most nights. There are many benefits to this plant - as well as being calming, it can help to aid digestion and reduce cramps. As a luscious green plant, it also adds plenty of character to the garden.
Foxglove
Also known as drop-seed, foxglove holds the digitoxin that is used in modern medicine for heart regulatory tablets. Discovered by a doctor in the 18th century who was desperate to help his wife with an illness, foxglove has since been used to aid heart weakness, irregular heartbeats and improve the bloodstream to vital organs.
Meadow sweet
You can quite commonly find this one at the side of the road. Meadow sweet is a tall plant which grows clusters of white flowers and it has a long history as a medicinal plant and was a favourite among Tudor royalty for its sweet scent. As well as adding some beauty to our border here at Madingley Hall, it is also important to modern medicine, being one of the key ingredients for aspirin tablets!
What is your favourite medicinal plant?
It's difficult to chose just one, but I think it would have to be Americana, also known as ‘Virginia poke weed’.
This is a beautiful, maroon coloured plant, which in the garden has grown over six-feet in height.
Most commonly used as a dye plant, in the past people also chewed on the berries that Americana produce, in the belief that they would ease arthritic pain, and the symptoms of glandular fever.
The berries on this plant are highly toxic, so this is definitely a practice that's best left to the experts!
Which plants are associated with mental wellbeing?
The two that stand out to me are rosemary and camomile.
Rosemary has been used for its medicinal qualities since the 14th century, and traditionally is believed to aid memory and promote calmness.
Camomile lawn is much the same and is often found in herbal teas in the supermarket. This plant helps to aid sleep, relieve stress and help you relax, so similar to lemon verbena, this is a great tea to try before bed.
What advice would you share for people thinking about growing their own medicinal plant patch?
Growing your own patch of these plants can be really easy and quite simple.
I would recommend planting a small tub of mixed plants and herbs and placing it outside your backdoor. Each evening, as part of your routine, maybe after doing the washing-up for example, step outside and run your hands through their leaves to enjoy the scents and essences they provide.
To start, try planting a selection of pineapple sage, lemon verbena, some lavender, rosemary and a few English Marigolds to add a pop of colour to your tub. For some additional scents, why not pop a curry plant in or add some mint leaves too.

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