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Shandy Hall Gardens

Coxwold

Home of C18 author Laurence Sterne. 2 walled gardens, 1 acre of unusual perennials interplanted with tulips and old roses in low walled beds. In old quarry, another acre of trees, shrubs, bulbs, climbers and wild flowers encouraging wildlife, incl. over 430 recorded species of moths.
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    Shandy Hall was given that name after Laurence Sterne wrote ‘The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman’ here in the 18th century. It merits the name also because it was originally a medieval long hall, dating from c. 1450. The garden around it must be very long established. Laurence Sterne was himself a gardener, and even grew nectarines. The present garden was created by Julia Monkman, who came here with her husband Kenneth and in the 1970s established the Laurence Sterne Trust and the ‘lived-in museum’ with its collection relating to the life and work of Sterne. The garden is now managed entirely by volunteers. There are four main parts to the garden. The front garden has changed little in its basic form from the very earliest illustrations of the house. Box-edged beds enclose roses and white violas after tulips in the spring. Two variegated holly trees flank the front door, and New Dawn rose grows over the front walls. Behind the cottage and gallery is a square garden with a central sundial, with roses and cottage-garden perennials. Through a small apple orchard is a further walled garden, and by the lightning-struck sweet chestnut tree is an entrance leading to a further acre of woodland in a former stone quarry. This part of the garden is known as the Wild Garden, (though all parts of the garden are managed for wildlife) and mown paths wind through meadow areas as well as some larger specimen plants. There are many bulbs and hellebores in the spring. It is a good place for a picnic, or for quietly sitting and listening to the birdsong. Though Shandy Hall gardens are open to the public every day (except Saturdays) from May to September, we have chosen to open later in the evenings for the National Gardens Scheme. Evening is a particularly lovely time in the garden. Moth trapping, identification and release will take place on NGS nights. Over 430 different species have been captured in the gardens – you are welcome to come and learn more about these beautiful and rarely seen creatures at 7.15 pm, when moths caught the previous night will be identified and released and the trap set for the following night.

Features and Attractions

Moth trap, identification and release. Wildlife garden.

For other opening times and information, please phone or visit garden website.

Shandy Hall Gardens- Canceled

Refreshments:

On this day, this garden is open by arrangement, which means that you will have to contact the owner to arrange visits for groups.

Pre-booking essential, please go to our events page to book your tickets.

Admission by donation

Admission:
  • Adult:
  • Concessions:
  • Child:

On this day, this garden opens as part of .

Admission also gets you entry to this garden in the area:

Click the dropdown arrow next to the opening date above to find details of entry costs and to add the opening to your online calendar.

Click on any opening date on the calendar above to find details of entry times, entry price and to add the opening to your online calendar.

  • Regular opening
  • Open by arrangement only
  • Cancelled opening
Owner Information

The Laurence Sterne Trust
01347 868465
http://www.laurencesternetrust.org.uk/shandy-hall-garden.php

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How to find us

Shandy Hall Gardens
Coxwold
Yorkshire
YO61 4AD

N of York.
Accessibility information

Wheelchair access to wild garden by arrangement.

More about Shandy Hall Gardens

Shandy Hall was given that name after Laurence Sterne wrote ‘The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman’ here in the 18th century. It merits the name also because it was originally a medieval long hall, dating from c. 1450. The garden around it must be very long established. Laurence Sterne was himself a gardener, and even grew nectarines. The present garden was created by Julia Monkman, who came here with her husband Kenneth and in the 1970s established the Laurence Sterne Trust and the ‘lived-in museum’ with its collection relating to the life and work of Sterne. The garden is now managed entirely by volunteers. There are four main parts to the garden. The front garden has changed little in its basic form from the very earliest illustrations of the house. Box-edged beds enclose roses and white violas after tulips in the spring. Two variegated holly trees flank the front door, and New Dawn rose grows over the front walls. Behind the cottage and gallery is a square garden with a central sundial, with roses and cottage-garden perennials. Through a small apple orchard is a further walled garden, and by the lightning-struck sweet chestnut tree is an entrance leading to a further acre of woodland in a former stone quarry. This part of the garden is known as the Wild Garden, (though all parts of the garden are managed for wildlife) and mown paths wind through meadow areas as well as some larger specimen plants. There are many bulbs and hellebores in the spring. It is a good place for a picnic, or for quietly sitting and listening to the birdsong. Though Shandy Hall gardens are open to the public every day (except Saturdays) from May to September, we have chosen to open later in the evenings for the National Gardens Scheme. Evening is a particularly lovely time in the garden. Moth trapping, identification and release will take place on NGS nights. Over 430 different species have been captured in the gardens – you are welcome to come and learn more about these beautiful and rarely seen creatures at 7.15 pm, when moths caught the previous night will be identified and released and the trap set for the following night.

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