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Turn End

Aylesbury

Intriguing series of garden rooms each with a different planting style enveloping architect’s own post-war 2* listed house (not open). Dry garden, small woodland, formal box garden, sunken gardens, mixed borders around curving lawn, framed by ancient walls and mature trees. Bulbs, irises, wisteria, roses, ferns and climbers. Courtyards with pools, pergolas, secluded seating, Victorian Coach House.
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    The garden was created as an integral part of a 1960s house, one of a group of three designed by architect Peter Aldington, now listed at grade 2*; only 12 post war houses are so designated. In November 2017 Turn End’s garden was also listed at Grade II.

    In less than an acre, space is used to create an illusion of size. A house courtyard with a naturalised pool; a small woodland area around 100 year old apple trees; a curved glade leading to a series of garden rooms, sunken or raised, sunny or shady, geometric or informal, yet all harmonious and unifying irregular geography with the buildings. When bought in 1963 the land was densely overgrown to a height of 20 feet in places. It had once been a garden, and the attraction was the mixture of mature deciduous and coniferous trees, with some remaining ancient walls and a Victorian Coach House. In essence the design is of strong structures within, around and over which plants are allowed to develop. The small scale necessitates careful choice of plants and pruning. This is a garden whose character changes constantly with the seasons. The ground is carpeted by spring bulbs, while the summer brings enclosure, irises, herbaceous plantings, old roses, shrubs and climbers.

    The historic and design significance of the garden was recognised when it was listed on Historic England's Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest at Grade II. This acknowledges the post-war garden's interlinked informal spaces and garden rooms with naturalised planting around existing trees, all interwoven with the house, reflecting Aldington's hands-on approach, spatial skills as a designer and deep understanding of materials and plants. Created in conjunction with the house, it is an expression of the architect's belief that architecture and landscape design are an indivisible whole. This intimate linkage is rare in a later 20th Century scheme and Turn End is the only post-war listed project where the house and garden were created by the same hand. The houses and garden are also noted as exemplary as a model of later 20th Century intervention in a historic environment.

    The garden and group of three houses is the subject of a book 'A Garden and Three Houses' by Jane Brown in which the late Sir Peter Shepherd commented ‘I know of no other garden which packs such riches into so small a space with such interesting and beautiful plants.’

    Turn End hosts an Artist in Residence, Heather Hunter, and the estate includes the studio of award-winning photographer Paul Wilkinson. The Turn End Trust was established in 1998 to promote the integration of building and garden design; enable pubic access to this and other examples; and eventually, after bequest by the Aldingtons, to conserve and maintain Turn End, its garden and associated buildings. The Trust organises a programme of public events, including seasonal walks, lectures, workshops and exhibitions.

    ‘The witty way in which Turn End is conceived as a series of walled enclosures, some open to the sky, others roofed… There is nothing else like Aldington's houses and garden at Haddenham in post-war British architecture’. Dan Cruickshank, RIBA Journal, Oct.1996.

Features and Attractions

Open studios with displays and demonstrations by creative artists.

Turn End- Canceled

Refreshments:

On this day, this garden is open by arrangement, which means that you will have to contact the owner to arrange visits for groups.

Pre-booking essential, please go to our events page to book your tickets.

Admission by donation

Admission:
  • Adult:
  • Concessions:
  • Child:

On this day, this garden opens as part of .

Admission also gets you entry to this garden in the area:

Click the dropdown arrow next to the opening date above to find details of entry costs and to add the opening to your online calendar.

Click on any opening date on the calendar above to find details of entry times, entry price and to add the opening to your online calendar.

  • Regular opening
  • Open by arrangement only
  • Cancelled opening
Owner Information

Peter & Margaret Aldington
turnendtrustevents@gmail.com
http://www.turnend.org.uk

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How to find us

Turn End
Townside
Haddenham
Aylesbury
Buckinghamshire
HP17 8BG

3m NE of Thame, 5m SW of Aylesbury.
  • More detailed directions
    Exit A418 to Haddenham. Turn at Rising Sun to Townside. Street parking, very limited. Please park in village with consideration of neighbours. Visit Turn End website for parking info.
Accessibility information

Steps, narrow archways, stone and gravel pathways.

More about Turn End

The garden was created as an integral part of a 1960s house, one of a group of three designed by architect Peter Aldington, now listed at grade 2*; only 12 post war houses are so designated. In November 2017 Turn End’s garden was also listed at Grade II.

In less than an acre, space is used to create an illusion of size. A house courtyard with a naturalised pool; a small woodland area around 100 year old apple trees; a curved glade leading to a series of garden rooms, sunken or raised, sunny or shady, geometric or informal, yet all harmonious and unifying irregular geography with the buildings. When bought in 1963 the land was densely overgrown to a height of 20 feet in places. It had once been a garden, and the attraction was the mixture of mature deciduous and coniferous trees, with some remaining ancient walls and a Victorian Coach House. In essence the design is of strong structures within, around and over which plants are allowed to develop. The small scale necessitates careful choice of plants and pruning. This is a garden whose character changes constantly with the seasons. The ground is carpeted by spring bulbs, while the summer brings enclosure, irises, herbaceous plantings, old roses, shrubs and climbers.

The historic and design significance of the garden was recognised when it was listed on Historic England's Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest at Grade II. This acknowledges the post-war garden's interlinked informal spaces and garden rooms with naturalised planting around existing trees, all interwoven with the house, reflecting Aldington's hands-on approach, spatial skills as a designer and deep understanding of materials and plants. Created in conjunction with the house, it is an expression of the architect's belief that architecture and landscape design are an indivisible whole. This intimate linkage is rare in a later 20th Century scheme and Turn End is the only post-war listed project where the house and garden were created by the same hand. The houses and garden are also noted as exemplary as a model of later 20th Century intervention in a historic environment.

The garden and group of three houses is the subject of a book 'A Garden and Three Houses' by Jane Brown in which the late Sir Peter Shepherd commented ‘I know of no other garden which packs such riches into so small a space with such interesting and beautiful plants.’

Turn End hosts an Artist in Residence, Heather Hunter, and the estate includes the studio of award-winning photographer Paul Wilkinson. The Turn End Trust was established in 1998 to promote the integration of building and garden design; enable pubic access to this and other examples; and eventually, after bequest by the Aldingtons, to conserve and maintain Turn End, its garden and associated buildings. The Trust organises a programme of public events, including seasonal walks, lectures, workshops and exhibitions.

‘The witty way in which Turn End is conceived as a series of walled enclosures, some open to the sky, others roofed… There is nothing else like Aldington's houses and garden at Haddenham in post-war British architecture’. Dan Cruickshank, RIBA Journal, Oct.1996.

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