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Jericho

Inspired by Vita Sackville-West 60 yrs ago, the 100 metre, s-facing, walled garden is divided into a series of secret spaces. The house is clothed in wisteria, clematis and roses. A plant-led garden with massive hornbeam hedge, clipped box and lavender. A hosta courtyard. Over 50 labelled species roses, a chamomile lawn, plus a hot border. Snowdrops, crocuses and hellebores in early spring.

Sunday 26 February, Sunday 21 May, Monday 29 May, Sunday 18 June (12 - 5pm). Admission £3.50, children free. Tea.

Visitors also welcome by arrangement February to July for groups of 10+. Refreshments on request. Admission £3.50, children free. Light refreshments.

Stephen & Pepita Aris
01832 275416
stephenaris@btinternet.com

Wheelchair access is possible, but paths are quite narrow.

How to find us

Jericho, 42 Market Place, Oundle, Northamptonshire, PE8 4AJ

East Jericho. From the Jericho cul-de-sac at the E end of the market place, go through facing grey door, through passage, down yard to ticket desk & garden.

More about Jericho

The Jericho garden, which lies a few yards from the centre of a lively market town, is remarkable for its tranquillity. The 100-metre, south-facing walled garden was inspired by Vita Sackville-West, the gardening writer and creator of Sissinghurst. It was designed by the present owner’s mother, over 50 years ago, as a series of 'garden rooms': a round–the-corner garden… always surprising. The house is clothed in wisteria, clematis and roses. Roses with hips are another theme borrowed from Sissinghurst: Scharlachglut (Scarlet glow) is covered with scarlet balls on a south wall. A massive hornbeam hedge screens the garden from the house, while an arch invites the visitor in, down a green alley.

Clipped box and lavender frame the herb garden and lead the eye on towards the shrubbery and the orchard. Beyond, the garden opens up to a lawn with a venerable apple tree and at the far end a pergola clothed with rambler roses. At the bottom a stand of mature trees includes a scarlet oak and a pseudo-acacia. It is a garden for all seasons. Aquilegias, foxgloves and many spring bulbs are happy here. Tall evergreen columns of Irish yew and juniper contrast with the naturalistic planting.