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Admington Hall

Shipston-on-Stour

A continually evolving 10 acre garden with an established structure of innovative planning and planting. An extensive collection of fine and mature specimen trees provide the essential core structure to this traditional country garden. Features incl a lush broad lawn, orchard, water garden, large walled garden, wild flower meadows and extensive modern topiary. This is a garden in motion.
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    Mark and Antonia Davies

    A beautiful Grade II* Listed country house on the edge of the Cotswolds. The current owners have been here for 21 years. During that time they have broadly maintained the structure of the garden but have transformed the planting. With the arrival of a new Head Gardener there are many more exciting plans for change. This is a garden in motion, evolving with confidence.

    Near the house the planting is quite formal. There are rectangular forms, often defined by hedges, of which many are quite new and developing. Away from the house plantings are less formal, with picturesque moments helped by the stream which girdles the whole garden area.

    First Impressions

    From Admington village we pass the gates of the property and the stables on the right which lead onto a long brick wall, covered by repeat planting Rosa ‘Cooper’s Burmese’.

    Entering the garden from the far end of the broad lawn we have a good view of the house. The stone frontage is Georgian with an Edwardian extension and backs onto the original 17th Century house. There are many new, young plantings around the lawn – cedars, maples, American oaks, American sweetgum among others. There are also a number of mature trees, including field maple, horse chestnut, beech and red oak. The house is flanked on both sides by mature cedar of Lebanon, the traditional ‘must have’ trees of the Georgian period. In contrast, a sculpture of two boxing hares rise up in mad March style. Behind us we can admire the view up to the surrounding hills and the undulating countryside beyond.

    Climbing the front of the house are Rosa ‘Cooper’s Burmese’ and R. “Golden Showers”. A fine example of a mature wisteria with its lovely gnarled trunk shrouds the portico . Planting here consists of simple shrubs, herbaceous perennials and large clouds of clipped box topiary.

    The White and Pool gardens

    Turning right we pass into the White Garden, a York stone path flanked by two beds containing varieties of white flowering shrubs, herbaceous perennials and annuals and the traditional Rosa ‘Iceberg’ which is prominent throughout the garden.

    We then move into the Pool Garden, with the pool house on the left. Here we find a number of Italian Terrace pots with a variety of annual colour, all grown from cuttings on site to include the prolific flowering plumbago. Young yew is prominent, as it is throughout the garden. Rosa ’Sally Holmes’ underplanted with Galtonia candicans, Salvia nemorosa, Thalictrum ‘Elin’ and Lupinus ‘Masterpiece’ scattered throughout. The robust white-flowering Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Stand up Comedian’ grows prominently.

    The Walled Garden

    The walled garden is divided into a number of areas by strong, low hedging, including innovative combinations of box and yew. Two short avenues of pleached and layered hornbeam are unusual in their presentation. There is a gravelled central walkway edged by varieties of thyme, leading to a central water feature with a cherub in lead. Here we can see four productive working beds, supplying year round vegetables and flowers for the house and a newly positioned ornamental fruit cage. The stream flows through the bottom of the garden behind a tall hornbeam hedge. At the top end of the walled garden near the house is a deep and richly planted new border, enjoying the heat of the brick wall. A Hartley Botanic greenhouse stands proud with varieties of Pelargonium, Streptocarpus, begonias, bougainvillea and orchids filling the benches.

    Apostle Borders

    We exit towards the house, passing “The Thinker” on our right, a figurative statue in lead who stands pensively outside the main entrance to the Walled Garden. This brings us into the main drive which is flanked by two striking borders to our left, full of vermilion reds, claret and the gushing pink of geranium 'Psilostemon'. There are twelve Irish ‘Apostle’ yews, eleven inside the main drive to the house and one, Judas Iscariot, poignantly positioned outside the entrance. Looking beyond Judas towards the main gates, note the seventeenth century gabled Dovecote and the sweet chestnut on the right.

    The Courtyard Garden

    Turning left towards the rear of the house we pass a line of three hybrid Crataegus x lavalleei ‘Carrieri' and then left again into the Courtyard Garden, passing a pair of stone dogs on guard. We now face the oldest part of the house, built in mellow Hornton stone and dating originally from 1548. There are small lawns, defined by low box and large topiary yew. At the drive end is a large oak arbour, an abundant grape entwined with wisteria clambers up the oak timbering and a Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris grows in the corner. Standing with your back to the arbour, note the bulge in the walls of the house. Schizophragma hydrangeoides and climbing roses cover a new brick extension to the house, built by the current owners in 1995 onto an existing single storey building. Among the mixed planting of perennials in the Courtyard is Rosa ‘Raubritter’, a favourite of the owner, punctuated by pyramids of yew within the borders for year-round structure.

    The Orchard

    From the Courtyard Garden we move into a smaller courtyard with the familiar Rosa ‘Iceberg’ and R. ’Mermaid’ covering the walls and further Italian Terrace pots with standard topiary flanking the back entrance to the house. On the right is the orchard, a mass of bulbs such as Camassia, Fritillaria, Scilla and dwarf Narcissus carpeting the grassy areas in the spring. Mown paths wind through the long grass which is currently in the process of being planted into par-terre meadow and the trees are a mixture of apple, pear, plum and walnut. A pair of mature horse chestnuts stand proud in the middle.

    We turn left along a green walkway, with oaks and hazel on the right, underplanted with a sea of Camassias. Philadelphus and beech flank the stream on the left. Looking ahead there are lovely English views of the mature treescape and rolling hills ahead, interspersed with herbaceous plantings on the right and a meandering stream on the left.

    The Yew Garden

    This consists of various different shapes and sizes of clipped yew topiary. Italian Terrace pots generously filled with Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’ offer a sharp contrast to the structured shapes of the yew. We are then taken into a narrow stretch of garden flanked by Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’ that sit inside small platforms of densely planted Sarcococca. We cross the wooden bridge, noting the herons in the stream on the left. Japanese maples beside the stream add an oriental touch. We pass golden rain trees on both sides and enter an avenue of tulip trees, soon crossed by another avenue of the same species with a row of pleached lime punctuating the end of the garden. A large wild flower meadow, which is in the process of being established surrounds a new avenue of hornbeam, in the middle of which there is an ornate rose arbour with Rosa ‘Mortimer Sackler’ climbing up the 7 metal plinths.

    Turning left at the end of the hornbeam avenue, move south past the meadow towards the pond, an area dominated by mature trees. You will see examples of different species of oak, pine and a handsome Cornus kousa. One striking tree is a large ash, notable for its shape, bark, height and health. Although partially hidden, it is one of the best trees in the garden.

    Walking on, we pass the pond on our left, with Ligularia, Telekia, Lythrum and Salix, a carpet of hyacinths in spring. Beyond is a tennis court surrounded by a large hornbeam hedge and a grove of ornamental flowering cherries densely underplanted with Narcissus “‘Thalia’. Finally we reach a glade of silver birch and further Scots pine before re-emerging at the top end of the broad lawn where we return to a line of old rough iron fencing, marking the transition

    There will be a wonderful selection of.

Admington Hall- Canceled

Refreshments:

On this day, this garden is open by arrangement, which means that you will have to contact the owner to arrange visits for groups.

Pre-booking essential, please go to our events page to book your tickets.

Admission by donation

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  • Regular opening
  • Open by arrangement only
  • Cancelled opening
Owner Information

Mark & Antonia Davies
01789 450279
adhall@admington.com

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How to find us

Admington Hall
Admington
Shipston-on-Stour
Warwickshire
CV36 4JN

6m NW of Shipston-on-Stour.
  • More detailed directions
    From Ilmington, follow signs to Admington. Approx 2m, turn R to Admington by Polo Ground. Continue for 1m.
Accessibility information

Wheelchair access to most parts of garden, albeit some routes will take slightly longer.

More about Admington Hall

Mark and Antonia Davies

A beautiful Grade II* Listed country house on the edge of the Cotswolds. The current owners have been here for 21 years. During that time they have broadly maintained the structure of the garden but have transformed the planting. With the arrival of a new Head Gardener there are many more exciting plans for change. This is a garden in motion, evolving with confidence.

Near the house the planting is quite formal. There are rectangular forms, often defined by hedges, of which many are quite new and developing. Away from the house plantings are less formal, with picturesque moments helped by the stream which girdles the whole garden area.

First Impressions

From Admington village we pass the gates of the property and the stables on the right which lead onto a long brick wall, covered by repeat planting Rosa ‘Cooper’s Burmese’.

Entering the garden from the far end of the broad lawn we have a good view of the house. The stone frontage is Georgian with an Edwardian extension and backs onto the original 17th Century house. There are many new, young plantings around the lawn – cedars, maples, American oaks, American sweetgum among others. There are also a number of mature trees, including field maple, horse chestnut, beech and red oak. The house is flanked on both sides by mature cedar of Lebanon, the traditional ‘must have’ trees of the Georgian period. In contrast, a sculpture of two boxing hares rise up in mad March style. Behind us we can admire the view up to the surrounding hills and the undulating countryside beyond.

Climbing the front of the house are Rosa ‘Cooper’s Burmese’ and R. “Golden Showers”. A fine example of a mature wisteria with its lovely gnarled trunk shrouds the portico . Planting here consists of simple shrubs, herbaceous perennials and large clouds of clipped box topiary.

The White and Pool gardens

Turning right we pass into the White Garden, a York stone path flanked by two beds containing varieties of white flowering shrubs, herbaceous perennials and annuals and the traditional Rosa ‘Iceberg’ which is prominent throughout the garden.

We then move into the Pool Garden, with the pool house on the left. Here we find a number of Italian Terrace pots with a variety of annual colour, all grown from cuttings on site to include the prolific flowering plumbago. Young yew is prominent, as it is throughout the garden. Rosa ’Sally Holmes’ underplanted with Galtonia candicans, Salvia nemorosa, Thalictrum ‘Elin’ and Lupinus ‘Masterpiece’ scattered throughout. The robust white-flowering Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Stand up Comedian’ grows prominently.

The Walled Garden

The walled garden is divided into a number of areas by strong, low hedging, including innovative combinations of box and yew. Two short avenues of pleached and layered hornbeam are unusual in their presentation. There is a gravelled central walkway edged by varieties of thyme, leading to a central water feature with a cherub in lead. Here we can see four productive working beds, supplying year round vegetables and flowers for the house and a newly positioned ornamental fruit cage. The stream flows through the bottom of the garden behind a tall hornbeam hedge. At the top end of the walled garden near the house is a deep and richly planted new border, enjoying the heat of the brick wall. A Hartley Botanic greenhouse stands proud with varieties of Pelargonium, Streptocarpus, begonias, bougainvillea and orchids filling the benches.

Apostle Borders

We exit towards the house, passing “The Thinker” on our right, a figurative statue in lead who stands pensively outside the main entrance to the Walled Garden. This brings us into the main drive which is flanked by two striking borders to our left, full of vermilion reds, claret and the gushing pink of geranium 'Psilostemon'. There are twelve Irish ‘Apostle’ yews, eleven inside the main drive to the house and one, Judas Iscariot, poignantly positioned outside the entrance. Looking beyond Judas towards the main gates, note the seventeenth century gabled Dovecote and the sweet chestnut on the right.

The Courtyard Garden

Turning left towards the rear of the house we pass a line of three hybrid Crataegus x lavalleei ‘Carrieri' and then left again into the Courtyard Garden, passing a pair of stone dogs on guard. We now face the oldest part of the house, built in mellow Hornton stone and dating originally from 1548. There are small lawns, defined by low box and large topiary yew. At the drive end is a large oak arbour, an abundant grape entwined with wisteria clambers up the oak timbering and a Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris grows in the corner. Standing with your back to the arbour, note the bulge in the walls of the house. Schizophragma hydrangeoides and climbing roses cover a new brick extension to the house, built by the current owners in 1995 onto an existing single storey building. Among the mixed planting of perennials in the Courtyard is Rosa ‘Raubritter’, a favourite of the owner, punctuated by pyramids of yew within the borders for year-round structure.

The Orchard

From the Courtyard Garden we move into a smaller courtyard with the familiar Rosa ‘Iceberg’ and R. ’Mermaid’ covering the walls and further Italian Terrace pots with standard topiary flanking the back entrance to the house. On the right is the orchard, a mass of bulbs such as Camassia, Fritillaria, Scilla and dwarf Narcissus carpeting the grassy areas in the spring. Mown paths wind through the long grass which is currently in the process of being planted into par-terre meadow and the trees are a mixture of apple, pear, plum and walnut. A pair of mature horse chestnuts stand proud in the middle.

We turn left along a green walkway, with oaks and hazel on the right, underplanted with a sea of Camassias. Philadelphus and beech flank the stream on the left. Looking ahead there are lovely English views of the mature treescape and rolling hills ahead, interspersed with herbaceous plantings on the right and a meandering stream on the left.

The Yew Garden

This consists of various different shapes and sizes of clipped yew topiary. Italian Terrace pots generously filled with Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’ offer a sharp contrast to the structured shapes of the yew. We are then taken into a narrow stretch of garden flanked by Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’ that sit inside small platforms of densely planted Sarcococca. We cross the wooden bridge, noting the herons in the stream on the left. Japanese maples beside the stream add an oriental touch. We pass golden rain trees on both sides and enter an avenue of tulip trees, soon crossed by another avenue of the same species with a row of pleached lime punctuating the end of the garden. A large wild flower meadow, which is in the process of being established surrounds a new avenue of hornbeam, in the middle of which there is an ornate rose arbour with Rosa ‘Mortimer Sackler’ climbing up the 7 metal plinths.

Turning left at the end of the hornbeam avenue, move south past the meadow towards the pond, an area dominated by mature trees. You will see examples of different species of oak, pine and a handsome Cornus kousa. One striking tree is a large ash, notable for its shape, bark, height and health. Although partially hidden, it is one of the best trees in the garden.

Walking on, we pass the pond on our left, with Ligularia, Telekia, Lythrum and Salix, a carpet of hyacinths in spring. Beyond is a tennis court surrounded by a large hornbeam hedge and a grove of ornamental flowering cherries densely underplanted with Narcissus “‘Thalia’. Finally we reach a glade of silver birch and further Scots pine before re-emerging at the top end of the broad lawn where we return to a line of old rough iron fencing, marking the transition

There will be a wonderful selection of.

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