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Acton Court

Bristol

3 acres: Beautiful walled wildflower meadow and apple orchard with an abundance of old English and wild roses on the grounds of a grade 1 listed Tudor Manor House (restricted access). Organic kitchen garden producing vegetables, culinary and medicinal herbs, with lavender centrepiece. The site is Soil Association certified and promotes wildlife.
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    Acton Court is a rare example of an Early Tudor Courtier’s House. The remaining East wing was built in 9 months for a weekend visit by Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn during their summer progress through the West Country in 1535. It is grade 1 listed and the entire site and building is an ancient scheduled monument. In the 16th century, Acton Court would have had grand and extensive gardens and orchards. Today, the garden and grounds are part of the Scheduled Monument and are subject to limitations regarding works: digging especially is discouraged. The Acton Court gardener, Nic Jones, started the garden virtually from scratch following the extensive archaeological excavations and years of neglect prior to that. The ground is very stoney and the soil is mainly clay. Natural meadows that support native wildlife species have proved to be a good solution for the site. Nic cultivates the walled wildflower meadow and orchard, Old English and wild roses and has also created an organic kitchen garden on medieval lines, which produces quality vegetables, culinary and medicinal herbs and sports a fine lavender centre piece. The remaining 10 acres of grounds are managed as meadow and rough grassland which supports the owl and raptor populations. Numerous native species of grasses and plants, some now quite rare in the UK, are featured and especially types that would have flourished in Tudor times. Acton Court is an organic site and Soil Association Certified. As such no chemicals or artificial fertilisers are used so we are not ‘weed’ free.

Features and Attractions

Acton Court will be sponsoring several special events on the themes of The Tudors, wildlife and music in support of our NGS days. Details on our website and social media. Charges may be made for additional activities.

Acton Court- Canceled

Refreshments:

On this day, this garden is open by arrangement, which means that you will have to contact the owner to arrange visits for groups.

Pre-booking essential, please go to our events page to book your tickets.

Admission by donation

Admission:
  • Adult:
  • Concessions:
  • Child:

On this day, this garden opens as part of .

Admission also gets you entry to this garden in the area:

Click the dropdown arrow next to the opening date above to find details of entry costs and to add the opening to your online calendar.

Click on any opening date on the calendar above to find details of entry times, entry price and to add the opening to your online calendar.

  • Regular opening
  • Open by arrangement only
  • Cancelled opening
Owner Information

01454 228224
info@actoncourt.com
http://www.actoncourt.com

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How to find us

Acton Court
Latteridge Road
Iron Acton
Bristol
Avon
BS37 9TL

10m NE of Bristol.
Accessibility information

Uneven ground, grass paths, kitchen garden not accessible - gravel path and step.

More about Acton Court

Acton Court is a rare example of an Early Tudor Courtier’s House. The remaining East wing was built in 9 months for a weekend visit by Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn during their summer progress through the West Country in 1535. It is grade 1 listed and the entire site and building is an ancient scheduled monument. In the 16th century, Acton Court would have had grand and extensive gardens and orchards. Today, the garden and grounds are part of the Scheduled Monument and are subject to limitations regarding works: digging especially is discouraged. The Acton Court gardener, Nic Jones, started the garden virtually from scratch following the extensive archaeological excavations and years of neglect prior to that. The ground is very stoney and the soil is mainly clay. Natural meadows that support native wildlife species have proved to be a good solution for the site. Nic cultivates the walled wildflower meadow and orchard, Old English and wild roses and has also created an organic kitchen garden on medieval lines, which produces quality vegetables, culinary and medicinal herbs and sports a fine lavender centre piece. The remaining 10 acres of grounds are managed as meadow and rough grassland which supports the owl and raptor populations. Numerous native species of grasses and plants, some now quite rare in the UK, are featured and especially types that would have flourished in Tudor times. Acton Court is an organic site and Soil Association Certified. As such no chemicals or artificial fertilisers are used so we are not ‘weed’ free.

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