Asthall Manor

Burford

6 acres of dramatic planting surround this C17 Cotswolds manor house (not open), once home to the Mitford family. The gardens, designed by I & J Bannerman in 1998, offer 'a beguiling mix of traditional and contemporary' as described by the Good Gardens Guide. Exuberant scented borders, sloping box parterres, wild flowers, a gypsy wagon, a turf sculpture and a hidden lake all contribute to the mix.
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    Asthall Manor, overlooking the swans and stumpy willows of the Windrush Valley, dates from the early seventeenth century, but probably occupies a medieval site. It is best known as the home, from 1919 to 1926, of the infamous Mitford sisters, and it was partly on this house that Nancy's fictional Alconleigh was based. The house is not open, except during the biennial exhibition of sculpture in stone (next on in 2018).

    The gardens were designed by I & J Bannerman in 1998. Their aim was to allow the garden to flow into the Windrush Valley landscape beyond it. The gardens blend form and freedom, open views and secret spaces. Long tranquil walks bordered with sharp wedges of yew, vast beeches enclosing a hidden lake, orchards sloping down to the mill stream, stone tubs overgrown with roses, formal box-bordered parterres and a contemporary earth sculpture overlooking the woods provide a quintessentially English mix. A natural swimming pool is a new feature, converted from the old swimming pool in 2013. There is also a substantial walled vegetable garden.
    Asthall Manor’s entrance is notable for the sculptures by Anthony Turner which adorn its gateposts. It has now become known as the home of 'on form sculpture', a biennial exhibition of sculpture in stone which has become loved for its ability to place sculpture in a way which complements, rather than detracts from, the landscape and garden. 'on form' is not on this year, and will next be open in 2018.

    Featured in 'Secret Gardens of the Cotswolds' by Victoria Summerley, and 'English Gardens' by Clive Nichols, both published in 2015.
    Clive Nichols: '“The garden today is like a circus, full of fun and tumbling plants. The exuberant planting and flowing spaces surprise and delight.”
    Also featured in Telegraph Magazine (2014) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardenstovisit/10895538/Asthall-Manor-hosts-sculpture-show-in-its-grounds.html
    .

Asthall Manor- Canceled

Refreshments:

On this day, this garden is open by arrangement, which means that you will have to contact the owner to arrange visits for groups.

Pre-booking essential, please go to our events page to book your tickets.

Admission by donation

Admission:
  • Adult:
  • Concessions:
  • Child:

On this day, this garden opens as part of .

Admission also gets you entry to this garden in the area:

Click the dropdown arrow next to the opening date above to find details of entry costs and to add the opening to your online calendar.

Click on any opening date on the calendar above to find details of entry times, entry price and to add the opening to your online calendar.

  • Regular opening
  • Open by arrangement only
  • Cancelled opening
Owner Information

Rosanna Pearson
http://www.onformsculpture.co.uk/asthall-manor

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How to find us

Asthall Manor
Asthall
Burford
Oxfordshire
OX18 4HW

3m E of Burford.
  • More detailed directions
    Going from Witney to Burford on A40, turn R at r'about. Coming from Chipping Norton, come through Shipton-under-Wychwood & Swinbrook. The nearest bus stop (a 10 min walk) is on route 233.
Accessibility information

Partial wheelchair access.

More about Asthall Manor

Asthall Manor, overlooking the swans and stumpy willows of the Windrush Valley, dates from the early seventeenth century, but probably occupies a medieval site. It is best known as the home, from 1919 to 1926, of the infamous Mitford sisters, and it was partly on this house that Nancy's fictional Alconleigh was based. The house is not open, except during the biennial exhibition of sculpture in stone (next on in 2018).

The gardens were designed by I & J Bannerman in 1998. Their aim was to allow the garden to flow into the Windrush Valley landscape beyond it. The gardens blend form and freedom, open views and secret spaces. Long tranquil walks bordered with sharp wedges of yew, vast beeches enclosing a hidden lake, orchards sloping down to the mill stream, stone tubs overgrown with roses, formal box-bordered parterres and a contemporary earth sculpture overlooking the woods provide a quintessentially English mix. A natural swimming pool is a new feature, converted from the old swimming pool in 2013. There is also a substantial walled vegetable garden.
Asthall Manor’s entrance is notable for the sculptures by Anthony Turner which adorn its gateposts. It has now become known as the home of 'on form sculpture', a biennial exhibition of sculpture in stone which has become loved for its ability to place sculpture in a way which complements, rather than detracts from, the landscape and garden. 'on form' is not on this year, and will next be open in 2018.

Featured in 'Secret Gardens of the Cotswolds' by Victoria Summerley, and 'English Gardens' by Clive Nichols, both published in 2015.
Clive Nichols: '“The garden today is like a circus, full of fun and tumbling plants. The exuberant planting and flowing spaces surprise and delight.”
Also featured in Telegraph Magazine (2014) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardenstovisit/10895538/Asthall-Manor-hosts-sculpture-show-in-its-grounds.html
.

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